Harnessing solar with ceramic particlesHarnessing solar with ceramic particles

03/10/2013

This news release from Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., which describes the lab’s efforts to develop a falling-particle receiver to harness solar power. Working with researchers from Georgia Tech, Bucknell University, King Saud University, and the Institute for Solar Research of the German Aerospace Center, Sandia scientists are trying to resurrect a solar energy technology that dates to the 1980s. Falling particle solar involves allowing sand-like ceramic particles to fall from the top of a receiver tower past a focused beam of sunlight from an array of solar concentrators, according to a previous Sandia release on the technology. The concentrated solar energy heats the particles to several hundred degrees Celsius. Heated particles are then stored in the topmost of a series of three tanks until energy is needed, at which point they are released to a middle tank where their heat is extracted. Cooled particles then drop to the lowest tank and are cycled back to the top of the tower to restart the process.

Source: American Ceramic Society

More:linkThis news release from Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, N.M., which describes the lab’s efforts to develop a falling-particle receiver to harness solar power. Working with researchers from Georgia Tech, Bucknell University, King Saud University, and the Institute for Solar Research of the German Aerospace Center, Sandia scientists are trying to resurrect a solar energy technology that dates to the 1980s. Falling particle solar involves allowing sand-like ceramic particles to fall from the top of a receiver tower past a focused beam of sunlight from an array of solar concentrators, according to a previous Sandia release on the technology. The concentrated solar energy heats the particles to several hundred degrees Celsius. Heated particles are then stored in the topmost of a series of three tanks until energy is needed, at which point they are released to a middle tank where their heat is extracted. Cooled particles then drop to the lowest tank and are cycled back to the top of the tower to restart the process.

Fuente: American Ceramic Society

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